BPA looking beyond Brexit in 2019

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The Chief Executive of the British Ports Association, Richard Ballantyne, has outlined the Association’s key priorities for 2019.

“The BPA is looking at challenges and opportunities facing UK ports beyond Brexit this year, although potential new border controls, changes to environmental and regulatory rules and a new fisheries policy remain as major themes for the industry in 2019. Whilst Brexit has often seemed all-consuming, the BPA is keen to focus on port sector promotion, increased public transport investment, planning/consenting improvements and issues around people and safety which will all be priorities for all ports across the UK. Working in partnership with the Westminster and devolved administrations will continue to be a feature this year.

Outlining the BPA’s key aims and on Brexit, Mr Ballantyne said:

‘2019 will be another critical year for UK ports and in the coming months we should start know what Brexit will look like. UK ports provides important international gateways for goods and passengers and it is essential that the industry features highly in the Government’s Brexit considerations. This is particularly important to pro-trade facilitation measures in relation to any new border control processes at British ports and especially at the UK’s network of Roll-on Roll-off ferry ports which facilitate much of the UK’s European trade.’

Alongside Brexit the BPA has been promoting a ‘Port Zoning’ policy which the BPA will be looking to evidence and provide further analysis on. Mr Ballantyne continued:

‘The BPA’s Port Development and Enterprise Zone concept is our vision is for areas around ports to be classified with a special planning, consenting, business and regulatory status to help stimulate port development and growth. The idea could see the growth of a network regional hubs around port and coastal locations across the UK. Ports themselves are often in areas of deprivation and economic need. Business, enterprise and skills incentives could be designed to help ports, tenants and connected businesses. Many of the rules in relation to environmental legislation and consenting stem from the EU and the BPA is encouraging policymakers to review how ports and coastal developers are regulated. There will also be opportunities to reach outside the industry and build in ‘Free Port’ free trade area designations into this where appropriate.’

Ballantyne also highlighted the call for a new UK freight strategy.

‘We have called for a new UK freight strategy and are working closely with the National Infrastructure Commission on the development of their freight study and the Scottish National Transport Strategy Review, which we hope will lead to renewed focus on freight in terms of transport policy. Alongside this we are also encouraging Government to put in place a coastal shipping policy.’

The BPA has also been promoting the sector outside the industry, with briefings, infographics, promotional videos and events for politicians. The Department for Transport is expected to publish the results of its Maritime 2050 review which looks at the future of the maritime sector out to 2050. This and the ongoing BPA Port Futures programme will provide opportunities for the BPA to highlight the role that ports play in the exciting and innovative future of the UK maritime sector.”